Acquired Aplastic Anemia

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Acquired Aplastic Anemia

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

Important
It is possible that the main title of the report Acquired Aplastic Anemia is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Synonyms

  • Idiopathic Aplastic Anemia

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Acquired aplastic anemia is a rare disorder caused by profound, almost complete bone marrow failure. Bone marrow is the spongy substance found in the center of the long bones of the body. The bone marrow produces specialized cells (hematopoietic stem cells) that grow and eventually develop into red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets. In acquired aplastic anemia, an almost complete absence of hematopoietic stem cells eventually results in low levels of red and white blood cells and platelets (pancytopenia). Specific symptoms associated with acquired aplastic anemia may vary, but include fatigue, chronic infections, dizziness, weakness, headaches, and episodes of excessive bleeding. Although some cases of acquired aplastic anemia occur secondary to other disorders, researchers now believe that most cases result from a disorder of the patient's immune system, in which the immune system mistakenly targets the bone marrow (autoimmunity). This is based on the response of approximately half of patients to immunotherapy, whether it is ATG, cyclosporine, high-dose steroids or cyclophosphamide.

Resources

Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation, Inc.
100 Park Avenue, Suite 108
Rockville, MD 20850
USA
Tel: (301)279-7202
Fax: (301)279-7205
Tel: (800)747-2820
Email: help@aamds.org
Internet: http://www.aamds.org

NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
P.O. Box 30105
Bethesda, MD 20892-0105
Tel: (301)592-8573
Fax: (301)251-1223
Email: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov
Internet: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

Aplastic Anemia & Myelodysplasia Association of Canada
11181 Yonge Street Suite 321
Richmond Hill
Ontario
Canada, Intl L4S 1L2
Tel: (905) 780-0698
Fax: (905) 780-1648
Tel: (888) 840-0039
Email: info@aamac.ca
Internet: http://www.aamac.ca

NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute ~ Hematology Branch
10 Center Dr, Building 10-CRC
3-5140, MSC-1202
Bethesda, MD 20892-1202
Tel: (301)496-5093
Fax: (301)496-8396
Tel: (800)644-2337
Email: YoungNS@mail.nih.gov
Internet: http://dir.nhlbi.nih.gov/labs/hb/index.asp?

Dubowitz Syndrome Support
c/o 106 Verndale Street
Warwick, RI 02889-3242
USA
Tel: (401)737-3138
Email: dubowitzsyndrome@netzero.net
Internet: http://www.dubowitzsyndrome.net

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311
TDD: (888)205-3223
Email: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/EmailForm.aspx
Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD

Madisons Foundation
PO Box 241956
Los Angeles, CA 90024
Tel: (310)264-0826
Fax: (310)264-4766
Email: getinfo@madisonsfoundation.org
Internet: http://www.madisonsfoundation.org

Anemia Institute for Research and Education
151 Bloor Street West, Suite 600
Toronto Ontario, M5S 1S4
Canada
Tel: 416-969-7431
Fax: 416-969-7420
Tel: 877-992-6364
Email: info@anemiainstitute.org
Internet: http://www.anemiainstitute.org

For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. ® (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be obtained for a small fee by visiting the NORD website. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational treatments (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, see http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

Last Updated:  4/27/2009
Copyright  1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2002, 2005, 2009 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

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