Molluscum Contagiosum

Search Knowledgebase

Topic Contents

Molluscum Contagiosum

Topic Overview

What is molluscum contagiosum?

Molluscum contagiosum is a skin infection that causes small pearly or flesh-coloured bumps. The bumps may be clear, and the centre often is indented. The infection is caused by a virus. The virus is easily spread but is not harmful.

What are the symptoms?

The bumps are round with a dimple in the centre. They are a little smaller in size than the eraser on the end of a pencil. The bumps don't cause pain. They may appear alone or in groups. They most often appear on the trunk, face, eyelids, or genital area. The bumps may become inflamed and turn red as your body fights the virus.

People who have a weakened immune system may have dozens of larger bumps. These may need special treatment.

How does molluscum contagiosum spread?

The virus commonly spreads through skin-to-skin contact. This includes sexual contact or touching the bumps and then touching the skin. Touching an object that has the virus on it, such as a towel, also can spread the infection. The virus can spread from one part of the body to another. Or it can spread to other people, such as among children at daycare or school. The infection is contagious until the bumps are gone.

The time from exposure to the virus until the bumps appear usually is 2 to 7 weeks, but it can take up to 6 months.1

To prevent molluscum contagiosum from spreading:

  • Try not to scratch.
  • Put a piece of tape or a bandage over the bumps.
  • Do not share towels or face cloths.
  • If the bumps are on your face, don't shave.
  • If the bumps are in your genital area, avoid sexual contact.

How is it diagnosed?

Your doctor will do a physical examination and may take a sample of the bumps for testing. If you have bumps in your genital area, your doctor may check for other sexually transmitted infections, such as genital herpes.

How is it treated?

Healthy people may not need treatment for molluscum contagiosum, because the bumps usually go away on their own in 2 to 4 months. Some people choose to remove the bumps because they don't like how the bumps look or they don't want to spread the virus to other people. Doctors usually recommend treatment for bumps in the genital area to prevent them from spreading.

If you need treatment, your choices may include:

  • Freezing the bumps, called cryotherapy or cryosurgery.
  • Scraping off the bumps, called curettage.
  • Putting a chemical on the bumps, like cantharidin or potassium hydrochloride.
  • Using liquids or creams, such as those used to treat warts.

Children may not need treatment because molluscum contagiosum usually goes away on its own. But if your child needs treatment, talk to your child's doctor about how to prevent pain and scarring.

Who gets molluscum contagiosum?

Molluscum contagiosum is most common in children, especially those younger than age 12. In teens and young adults, it usually is a sexually transmitted infection. But wrestlers, swimmers, gymnasts, massage therapists, and people who use steam rooms and saunas also can get it.

Molluscum contagiosum is more common in warm, humid climates with crowded living conditions.

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Learning about molluscum contagiosum:

Other Places To Get Help

Organizations

Canadian Dermatology Association
1385 Bank Street
Suite 425
Ottawa, ON  K1H 8N4
Phone: 1-800-267-3376
(613) 738-1748
Fax: (613) 738-4695
Email: contact.cda@dermatology.ca
Web Address: www.dermatology.ca
 

The Canadian Dermatology Association promotes research and education for dermatologists, provides information and support for dermatology patients, and offers public education materials on sun awareness and skin care.


U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
1600 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA  30333
Phone: 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)
TDD: 1-888-232-6348
Email: cdcinfo@cdc.gov
Web Address: www.cdc.gov
 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The CDC works with state and local health officials and the public to achieve better health for all people. The CDC creates the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health—by promoting health, preventing disease, injury, and disability, and being prepared for new health threats.


References

Citations

  1. American Academy of Pediatrics (2009). Molluscum contagiosum. In LK Pickering et al., eds., Red Book: 2009 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 28th ed., pp. 466–467. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

Other Works Consulted

  • Damon IK (2009). Molluscum contagiosum section of Other poxviruses that infect humans: Parapoxviruses, molluscum contagiosum, and yatapoxviruses. In RD Feigin et al. eds., Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 6th ed., pp. 1934–1935. Philadelphia: Saunders Elsevier.
  • Douglas JM (2008). Molluscum contagiosum. In KK Holmes et al., eds., Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 4th ed, pp. 545–552. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Gordon PM, Benton EC (2010). Molluscum contagiosum. In MG Lebwohl et al., eds., Treatment of Skin Disease: Comprehensive Therapeutic Strategies, 3rd ed., pp. 442–445. Edinburgh: Mosby Elsevier.
  • Habif TP (2010). Molluscum contagiosum section of Sexually transmitted viral infections. In Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy, 5th ed., pp. 428–430. Edinburgh: Mosby Elsevier.
  • Habif TP (2010). Molluscum contagiosum section of Warts, herpes simplex, and other viral infections. In Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy, 5th ed., pp. 465–466. Edinburgh: Mosby Elsevier.
  • Tom W, Friedlander SF (2008). Molluscipoxvirus infection: Molluscum contagiosum section of Poxvirus infections. In K Wolff et al., eds., Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine, 7th ed., vol. 2, pp. 1911–1913. New York: McGraw-Hill Medical.

Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Alexander H. Murray, MD, FRCPC - Dermatology
Last Revised December 20, 2010

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information.