Screening for Weight Problems

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Screening for Weight Problems

Topic Overview

Children

Doctors weigh children at routine checkups. They plot measurements on a growth chart to see how your child compares physically to other children of the same age. Doctors update the chart at each routine examination to document your child's growth pattern.

"Overweight" and "obese" are terms sometimes used when referring to children who weigh more than expected. Doctors use growth charts or the body mass index (BMI) to measure a child's weight in relation to his or her height. If your child is age 2 or older, find out his or her BMI with this Interactive Tool: What Is Your Child's BMI?

If you have concerns that your child is overweight or obese, ask your doctor to review your child's growth charts and medical history with you.

  • If your child's BMI has been high on the growth chart from birth, this may be his or her healthy size and growth rate. He or she may simply be bigger than other children of the same gender and age.
  • If your child's BMI pattern has suddenly jumped from a lower range to a higher range on the growth chart, your child may be at risk of becoming overweight. Your doctor will carefully track growth over time, watching for a change in the rate of weight gain. Your child may need counselling and other help to make lifestyle changes for a healthier weight.
  • If your family has a history of obesity, your child has a higher risk of becoming overweight.

Sometimes a child's BMI and weight can increase without a child being at risk of having too much body fat. For instance, before and during puberty it is normal for children to have a significant gain in weight before they begin to grow in height. Also, children who are very muscular (such as children who are very active in sports), may have a high BMI but have normal or even lower-than-normal amounts of body fat.

If your child's BMI and growth pattern suggest a weight problem, your doctor will give your child an examination that looks for health problems that can cause weight gain. This may include questions about eating and physical activity habits. Routine checkups for health problems will also be important over time.

Adults

If you are age 20 or older, use the Interactive Tool: Is Your BMI Increasing Your Health Risks? to check your BMI when you know your height in centimetres and weight in kilometres.

You can use BMI to decide whether your weight is dangerous to your health. If you have a BMI of 30 or higher, your extra weight may be putting your health in danger. If you are Asian, your health may be at risk with a BMI of 27.5 or higher.1

Where you carry your body fat may be as important as how much extra weight you have. People who carry too much fat around the middle, rather than around the hips, are more likely to have health problems. In women, a waist size of 88 cm (35 in.) or more raises the chance for disease. In men, a waist size of 102 cm (40 in.) or more raises the chance for disease.2 In Asian people, health problems are seen with a smaller waist size. In Asian women, a waist size of 80 cm (32 in.) or more raises the chance for disease. In Asian men, a waist size of 90 cm (36 in.) or more raises the chance for disease.1

For more information, see the topics Obesity, Weight Management, Healthy Eating, or Healthy Eating for Children.

Related Information

References

Citations

  1. Purnell JQ (2008). Obesity. In DC Dale, DD Federman, eds., ACP Medicine, section 3, chap. 10. Hamilton, ON: BC Decker.
  2. Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Canada (2003). Canadian Guidelines for Body Weight Classification in Adults. Ottawa: Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada (Health Canada). Available online: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/alt_formats/hpfb-dgpsa/pdf/nutrition/weight_book-livres_des_poids-eng.pdf.

Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Brian D. O'Brien, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Rhonda O'Brien, MS, RD, CDE - Certified Diabetes Educator
Last Revised June 12, 2011

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