Improving Your Child's Fitness

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Improving Your Child's Fitness

Topic Overview

Improving your child's or teen's fitness may boost his or her academic performance, self-concept, and mental health. Here are some helpful guidelines for improving your child's fitness.1

Children and teens need at least 1 hour of physical activity most days of the week, preferably daily. These include activities that:

  • Make them breathe harder and make the heart beat much faster.
  • Make their muscles stronger. For example, they could play on playground equipment, play tug-of-war, lift weights, or use resistance bands.
  • Make their bones stronger. For example, they could run, do hopscotch, jump rope, or play basketball or tennis.

It’s okay for them to be active in smaller blocks of time that add up to 1 hour or more each day.

Encourage your child to participate in various types of activities, including sports. You can join your child in some activities, such as vigorous walking, in-line skating, bicycling, tennis, dancing in the home, and exercising along with a TV program.

Related Information

References

Citations

  1. Health Canada (2008). Reaching for the top: A report by the advisor on healthy children and youth. Available online: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/pubs/child-enfant/advisor-conseillere/obesit-eng.php.

Credits

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer John Pope, MD - Pediatrics
Primary Medical Reviewer Andrew Swan, MD, CCFP, FCFP - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Stephen LaFranchi, MD - Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology
Last Revised September 24, 2010

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