Home » Health »

Bulgaria found to be the laziest country in Europe

 

It’s bad news for Bulgaria – it’s just been revealed to be the laziest country in Europe.

Some 78 per cent of adults living in the Balkan nation claim they don’t exercise at all, according to a new survey.

But at the other end of the spectrum, the cold landscape of Sweden was found to be the move active.

Nine in ten adults living in the forest-heavy nation hit the gym and stay active on a weekly basis, the research showed.

Residents in the UK fell midway in the full rankings, based on answers from 28,000 adults across all countries in the EU.

Some 78 per cent of adults living in the Balkan nation claim they don't exercise at all, according to a new survey. But at the other end of the spectrum, the cold landscape of Sweden was found to be the move active.nbsp;Nine in ten adults living in the forest-heavy nation hit the gym regularly

Some 78 per cent of adults living in the Balkan nation claim they don't exercise at all, according to a new survey. But at the other end of the spectrum, the cold landscape of Sweden was found to be the move active.nbsp;Nine in ten adults living in the forest-heavy nation hit the gym regularly

Some 78 per cent of adults living in the Balkan nation claim they don’t exercise at all, according to a new survey. But at the other end of the spectrum, the cold landscape of Sweden was found to be the move active. Nine in ten adults living in the forest-heavy nation hit the gym regularly

The poll, which was commissioned by Ladbrokes, quizzed 1,000 adults face-to-face in each of the 28 member states.

Each participants was asked how often they exercised or played sports. Answers were recorded for those who said ‘never’.  

Jessica Bridge of Ladbrokes told MailOnline: ‘With one of the highest obesity rates in Europe it’s perhaps not too surprising to see that Bulgarians can be a little shy when it comes to sport and physical activity.’

She added: ‘However, it’s a shame to see the UK outside of the Top 10 most active countries, perhaps an indication that the Olympic legacy is fading.’

Who are the most active?

THE FULL BREAKDOWN

The percentage written shows the amount of people in each country who said they never exercise or play sport.

Bulgaria

Malta

Portugal

Romania

Italy

Greece

Cyprus

Poland

Lithuania

Spain

Hungary 

France

Slovakia

Latvia

Estonia

UK

Czech Republic

Ireland

Belgium

Croatia

Netherlands

Germany

Luxembourg

Austria

Slovenia

Finland

Denmark

Sweden 

78%

75%

64%

60%

60%

59%

54%

52%

46%

44%

44%

42%

41%

39%

36%

35%

35%

34%

31%

29%

29%

29%

29%

27%

22%

15%

14%

9% 

Scandinavia, notorious for its high life expectancy rates and dazzling views of the Northern Lights, occupied the top three spots.

Denmark and Finland finished below Sweden, which was the only nation to record single figures in response to the question.

The former, famous for its pastries and love of bicycles, had only 14 per cent of its citizens claim to do no physical exercise at all. The latter scored 1 per cent worse.

Economic powerhouse Germany, famous for sausages, ranked in seventh place with three in ten of its population claiming to not exercise.

France, hosts of the most famous bike ride on the planet, took 17th with 42 per cent, while the pizza-loving Italians made the bottom five with 60 per cent. 

Who are the least active? 

Among the worst offenders for skipping the gym in Europe were minnows Malta, who recorded three-quarters of its citizens having a phobia of exercise. 

Portugal, with its array of beautiful beaches to exercise on and hilly terrain to keep residents fit, collected the third worst score, with 64 per cent.

Ireland ranked slightly better than the UK at 34 per cent, according to the small findings collated as part of the Ladbrokes Ultimate Athlete Campaign. 

The survey also showed men are 8 per cent more likely than women to exercise, with the biggest difference clearly shown at a younger age.

What do previous studies say? 

The new findings come nearly a year after a landmark study which collected data from 188 countries across the world in terms of their health.

At the time, University of Washington, Seattle, researchers placed Britain as being the fifth healthiest place to live in the world.

They found a clear difference in accessible healthcare across the US meant their own nation fell much further down the list in 28th place.

Their lowly ranking, below Brunei and Slovenia, was mainly due to deaths caused by HIV, alcohol and childhood obesity. 

 

Related Posts

  • No Related Posts