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Fascinating medical scans reveal the intricate workings of the human body

 

These fascinating pictures from an array of medical scans show what the body looks like during a stroke, brain death and even a sinus infection.

In-depth coloured shots reveal exactly what a person’s brain looks like under medical equipment when they have a tumour or hemorrhage.

A simple CT scan shows how a brain pacemaker can help to relieve symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s and improve their quality of life.

Other pictures include a slipped disc, how a broken leg is fixed and what a cochlear implant looks like inside a child’s head. 

‘Zephyr’, a French researcher, produced the incredible series of images to highlight how the human body looks like in the eyes of doctors, nurses and surgeons across the world.

He is a radiologist by profession, working in a hospital in France with access to all of the major technologies used in medical diagnostics.

His unique collection includes X-ray, ultrasound, CT (computer tomography), PET (positron emission tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and angiograms – an X-ray of blood vessels. 

This CT scan shows a 28-year-old patient on life support for brain death - the loss of all functions. It was caused by a lack of oxygen - also known as anoxia - after a prolonged cardiac arrest following a diving accident. A severe lack of density is visible across the brain - common for patients of anoxia

This CT scan shows a 28-year-old patient on life support for brain death – the loss of all functions. It was caused by a lack of oxygen – also known as anoxia – after a prolonged cardiac arrest following a diving accident. A severe lack of density is visible across the brain – common for patients of anoxia

This is what the brain looks like during a stroke. A CT scan revealed the how a 62-year-old was affected by paralysis on the right side of their body following a stroke. Here, a large hypodense area (bright, upper right) can be seen affecting the sylvian and ventricular regions. Strokes occur when the blood supply to an area of the brain is restricted, or cut off completely, resulting in cell death of the affected tissue

Brain in stroke, CT scan. Coloured computed tomography (CT) scan of an axial section through the brain of a 62-year-old person affected by hemiplegia (paralysis) of the right side of the body following a stroke (cerebral vascular accident, cva). Here, a large hypodense area (dark, upper right) can be seen affecting the sylvian and ventricular regions. Strokes occur when the blood supply to an area of the brain is restricted, or cut off completely, resulting in cell death of the affected tissue.

This is what the brain looks like during a stroke. A CT scan reveals how a 62-year-old was affected by paralysis on the right side of their body following a stroke (upper right). Strokes occur when the blood supply to an area of the brain is restricted, or cut off completely, resulting in cell death of the affected tissue

A MRI scan shows a large aneurysm occuring at the split of the internal carotid artery (round, centre-left) in a 22-year-old patient. Carotid arteries are responsible for transporting oxygen-rich blood to the head, brain and face. An aneurysm occurs when an artery wall weakens and swells like a balloon. If it bursts, an aneurysm can cause severe internal hemorrhage. Here, it was the result of a traumatic injury

A MRI scan shows a large aneurysm occuring at the split of the internal carotid artery (round, centre-left) in a 22-year-old patient. Carotid arteries are responsible for transporting oxygen-rich blood to the head, brain and face. An aneurysm occurs when an artery wall weakens and swells like a balloon. If it bursts, an aneurysm can cause severe internal hemorrhage. Here, it was the result of a traumatic injury

A CT scan shows the brain of a 54-year-old patient with Parkinson's disease. Electrodes from a deep brain stimulator have been implanted in the brain to allow for a pacemaker. This then sends impulses to the electrodes to stimulate areas of the brain (blue) and help relieve symptoms of the disease

A CT scan shows the brain of a 54-year-old patient with Parkinson’s disease. Electrodes from a deep brain stimulator have been implanted in the brain to allow for a pacemaker. This then sends impulses to the electrodes to stimulate areas of the brain (blue) and help relieve symptoms of the disease

A coloured 3D angiogram shows the skull and carotid arteries - which carries oxygen-rich blood to the head, brain and face (red) - of a 28-year-old patient. The scan was done as part of an assessment into a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) caused by a ruptured aneurysm. An aneurysm occurs when an artery wall weakens and swells like a balloon. If it bursts (centre-right), it can cause severe internal haemorrhage. A SAH is an uncommon type of stroke caused by bleeding on the surface of the brain

A coloured 3D angiogram shows the skull and carotid arteries – which carries oxygen-rich blood to the head, brain and face (red) – of a 28-year-old patient. The scan was done as part of an assessment into a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) caused by a ruptured aneurysm. An aneurysm occurs when an artery wall weakens and swells like a balloon. If it bursts (centre-right), it can cause severe internal haemorrhage. A SAH is an uncommon type of stroke caused by bleeding on the surface of the brain

This image shows inflammation of the left maxillary sinus (black, upper left) in a 24-year-old patient with sinusitis. It is usually caused by a viral infection when the lining of the sinuses becomes inflamed and often improves within three weeks

This image shows inflammation of the left maxillary sinus (black, upper left) in a 24-year-old patient with sinusitis. It is usually caused by a viral infection when the lining of the sinuses becomes inflamed and often improves within three weeks

Cochlear implants, which help to treat loss of hearing in both ears can be seen implanted into the head of a 14-year-old child. It consists of a sound processor that fits behind the ear, which passes sound signals to a transmitter (circular, upper left and right) attached to the scalp. The transmitter sends sound to electrodes implanted in the cochlea of the inner ear. The electrical impulses from the cochlea are passed to the brain, allowing the person to hear

Cochlear implants, which help to treat loss of hearing in both ears can be seen implanted into the head of a 14-year-old child. It consists of a sound processor that fits behind the ear, which passes sound signals to a transmitter (circular, upper left and right) attached to the scalp. The transmitter sends sound to electrodes implanted in the cochlea of the inner ear. The electrical impulses from the cochlea are passed to the brain, allowing the person to hear

An angiogram shows the effects of smoking in a 64-year-old with high blood pressure. The image shows narrowed lesions at the opening of two arteries - both in the neck - due to clogging from fatty substances. It also shows a severe narrowing of the left internal carotid artery and underdevelopment of the left vertebral artery

An angiogram shows the effects of smoking in a 64-year-old with high blood pressure. The image shows narrowed lesions at the opening of two arteries – both in the neck – due to clogging from fatty substances. It also shows a severe narrowing of the left internal carotid artery and underdevelopment of the left vertebral artery

Slipped disc. Coloured frontal X-ray of a section through the lower spine of a 40-year-old patient with a slipped spinal disc (white, centre) between  vertebrae

Slipped disc. Coloured computed tomography (CT) scan of an axial section through the lumbar spine of a 40-year-old patient with a slipped (herniated) spinal disc (white, centre) between the L4-L5 vertebrae.

A coloured frontal X-ray (left) and a CT scan (right) of a section through the lower spine of a 40-year-old patient with a slipped spinal disc (white, centre) between two vertebrae

A 3D CT scan of the ankle of a professional football player shows screws (dark, horizontal, upper centre) being used to hold the bone in place following a break affecting the tibia (shin bone) and fibula (calf bone)

A 3D CT scan of the ankle of a professional football player shows screws (dark, horizontal, upper centre) being used to hold the bone in place following a break affecting the tibia (shin bone) and fibula (calf bone)

A road traffic accident left this 57-year-old patient with skull fractures. Titanium plates and screws (white specks, centre) were used to repair the cracks while staples (white, upper left and top) were used to hold a dressing in place over the scalp 

A road traffic accident left this 57-year-old patient with skull fractures. Titanium plates and screws (white specks, centre) were used to repair the cracks while staples (white, upper left and top) were used to hold a dressing in place over the scalp

A coloured X-ray of a section through the head of a 46-year-old patient shows an increased number of blood vessels (bright lines) supplying a tumour in the brain. ing a an increased number of blood vessels (bright lines) supplying a meningioma in the region of the parietal and occipital lobes. Meningiomas are tumours arising from the meninges - the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system (CNS). They are usually benign (non-cancerous) but a small number are cancerous.

A coloured X-ray of a section through the head of a 46-year-old patient shows an increased number of blood vessels (bright lines) supplying a meningioma in the brain. Meningiomas are tumours arising from the meninges – the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system (CNS). They are usually benign but a small number are cancerous

A coloured 3D CT angiogram of the head of a 42-year-old patient shows the right internal and external carotid arteries, as part of an assessment for a meningeal haemorrhage. This is bleeding caused by damage to the middle meningeal artery

A coloured 3D CT angiogram of the head of a 42-year-old patient shows the right internal and external carotid arteries, as part of an assessment for a meningeal haemorrhage. This is bleeding caused by damage to the middle meningeal artery

A coloured 3D CT angiogram shows the torso of a 65-year-old patient with a synthetic aortic valve which has become blocked. Its job was to repair a chronic dissection of the aorta vessel. A dissection is a tear in the wall of an artery that allows blood to separate the wall layers.

A coloured 3D CT angiogram shows the torso of a 65-year-old patient with a synthetic aortic valve which has become blocked. Its job was to repair a chronic dissection of the aorta vessel. A dissection is a tear in the wall of an artery that allows blood to separate the wall layers.