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Footage shows mother-of-3 violently shaking

 
  • Charlene Jones, 31, suffered ‘unreal pain’ following surgery to take out the organ
  • She said she had a gallbladder infection, before doctors claimed to ‘know best’
  • Unhappy with the care she was given, she decided to seek treatment elsewhere
  • And Ms Jones believes she would be ‘seriously ill or dead’ had she not done so

Stephen Matthews For Mailonline

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Distressing footage shows a mother-of-three violently shaking in a hospital corridor after she claims bungling doctors failed to spot her infection.

Charlene Jones, 31, said she suffered ‘unreal pain’ following the operation to take out the organ at University Hospital Coventry.

The patient believes she just had a gallbladder infection, before doctors decided ‘they knew best’ and said it was her appendix causing her problems.

As a result of the wrong diagnosis, it is believed the infection spread and took hold of her body – leaving her screaming because of the stomach pain. 

Unhappy with the care she received, Ms Jones decided to seek urgent treatment in Birmingham. And she believes she would be ‘seriously ill or dead’ had she not.

Speaking of her ordeal at the hospital, she said: ‘I was examined the following morning and I was told that my pain was due to my appendix. 

Charlene Jones, 31, said she suffered 'unreal pain' following the operation to take out the organ at University Hospital Coventry (pictured before the operation)

Charlene Jones, 31, said she suffered 'unreal pain' following the operation to take out the organ at University Hospital Coventry (pictured before the operation)

The patient believes she just had a gallbladder infection, before doctors decided 'they knew best' and said it was her appendix causing her problems (pictured in hospital)

The patient believes she just had a gallbladder infection, before doctors decided 'they knew best' and said it was her appendix causing her problems (pictured in hospital)

Charlene Jones (pictured before the operation left), 31, said she suffered ‘unreal pain’ following the operation to take out the organ at University Hospital Coventry (pictured in hospital right)

‘Due to my scan I believed I was suffering from cholecystitis, but believing that they knew best I went into surgery that day.

‘I woke up at 8.45pm in recovery. I was shaking violently with stomach pain, screaming, knowing something wasn’t right.’

University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire has been asked for comment but said it was unable to discuss individual cases.

Timeline of events 

When Ms Jones arrived at University Hospital Coventry she was given an ultrasound scan which showed a thickened gallbladder.

Doctors at the hospital, which is also known by locals as Walsgrave, also said she had cholecystitis – inflammation of the gallbladder. 

She claims nurses wouldn’t offer any painkillers stronger than paracetamol and she was discharged on August 2, the day after the operation.

Ms Jones went home but her condition deteriorated and the following day she went to the hospital’s AE department.

Seeking help elsewhere 

After deciding she wasn’t happy with the care she was receiving, Ms Jones left and sought treatment at Birmingham City Hospital.

There she was put on morphine and antibiotics drips, before being transferred to Sandwell Hospital, near West Bromwich.

At that hospital, she claims she was treated for septic shock, and scans revealed she was suffering from a serious gallbladder infection.

‘My appendix was normal’

Ms Jones said: ‘I went to Birmingham hospital because I knew that my situation would not get the right care at Walsgrave.

‘The doctors and nurses at both Birmingham hospitals seemed to do more for me in an hour than Walsgrave did in 80 hours.

‘After strong painkillers and intravenous antibiotics I was in less pain.

‘The doctor at Birmingham couldn’t understand why my appendix was taken out when evidence pointed to cholecystitis. My appendix was perfectly normal.

‘I strongly believe that I would be seriously ill or dead had I not gone to Birmingham.’

Now at home and recovering, Ms Jones has lodged a formal complaint to the hospital.

Unhappy with the care she received at University Hospital Coventry, Ms Jones decided to seek urgent treatment in Birmingham

Unhappy with the care she received at University Hospital Coventry, Ms Jones decided to seek urgent treatment in Birmingham

And she believes she would be 'seriously ill or dead' had she not

And she believes she would be 'seriously ill or dead' had she not

Pictured during her shake in the hospital corridor

Pictured during her shake in the hospital corridor

Unhappy with the care she received at University Hospital Coventry, Ms Jones decided to seek urgent treatment in Birmingham. And she believes she would be ‘seriously ill or dead’ had she not (pictured shaking in the hospital corridor)

She said: ‘I don’t normally believe in making complaints as the NHS is a free service, but what they did to me was unacceptable. The pain was unreal.’

Unable to discuss the case 

University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire was approached for comment. But a spokesman insisted the Trust was ‘unable to discuss information about the care of individual patients’.

He added: ‘All our surgeons follow guidelines from the Royal College of Surgeons.

‘We would urge the patient to contact our Patient Advice and Liaison Service to discuss their care if they haven’t already done so.’ 

WHAT IS CHOLECYSTITIS? 

Acute cholecystitis is inflammation of the gallbladder. It usually occurs when a gallstone blocks the cystic duct.

Gallstones are small stones, usually made of cholesterol, that form in the gallbladder. The cystic duct is the main opening of the gallbladder.

Gallstones are very common, affecting about 1 in 10 adults in the UK. They don’t usually cause symptoms, but they can occasionally cause episodes of pain (biliary colic) or acute cholecystitis.

Acute cholecystitis is potentially serious. It usually needs to be treated in hospital with rest, intravenous fluids and antibiotics.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

The main symptom of acute cholecystitis is a sudden sharp pain in the upper right-hand side of your tummy (abdomen). This pain spreads towards your right shoulder.

The affected part of the abdomen is usually very tender, and breathing deeply can make the pain worse.

Unlike other types of abdominal pain, the pain of acute cholecystitis is usually persistent and doesn’t go away within a few hours.

TREATMENT

Removing your gallbladder may be recommended at some point after initial treatment to prevent acute cholecystitis recurring and reduce your risk of developing potentially serious complications.

Although some people who’ve had their gallbladder removed have reported symptoms of bloating and diarrhoea after eating certain foods, it’s possible to lead a perfectly normal life without a gallbladder.

Source: NHS Choices 

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