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Handful of nuts a day could prevent type 2 diabete

 
  • Once digested, omega-6 gets converted into the substance linoleic acid
  • Past studies show linoleic acid improves fat metabolism and insulin sensitivity
  • Linoleic acid cannot be produced in the body and needs to be taken in via food
  • As well as nuts, linoleic acid can be found in soybean, sunflower and seed oils
  • Findings contradict past studies that omega-6 increases inflammation  

Alexandra Thompson Health Reporter For Mailonline

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A handful of nuts a day could prevent type 2 diabetes, new research suggests.

Omega-6 rich foods, such as nuts and sunflower oil, lower a person’s risk of developing the condition by up to 35 per cent, a study review found.

Previous research reveals omega-6 gets converted into linoleic acid in the body, which may prevent type 2 diabetes by improving fat metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

Lead author Dr Jason Wu from The George Institute for Global Health in Sydney, said: ‘Our findings suggest that a simple change in diet might protect people from developing type 2 diabetes which has reached alarming levels around the world.’

Linoleic acid cannot be produced in the body and needs to be taken in via food.

A handful of nuts a day could prevent type 2 diabetes, new research suggests

A handful of nuts a day could prevent type 2 diabetes, new research suggests

A handful of nuts a day could prevent type 2 diabetes, new research suggests

HANDFUL OF ALMONDS A DAY BOOSTS ‘GOOD’ CHOLESTEROL THAT PREVENTS HEART DISEASE 

A handful of almonds a day boosts ‘good’ cholesterol levels, research revealed in August.

Eating the nuts every day increases levels of so-called ‘good’ cholesterol while also improving plaque removal from the body, a study found.

Just 43g of almonds improves good cholesterol levels by 19 percent, as well as boosting the removal of its ‘bad’ counterpart, research reveals.

Previous research reveals an increase in good cholesterol, and a decrease in bad, reduces a person’s risk of heart disease.

Study author Professor Kris-Etherton from Pennsylvania State University, said: ‘If people incorporate almonds into their diet, they should expect multiple benefits, including ones that can improve heart health.

‘They’re not a cure-all, but when eaten in moderation – and especially when eaten instead of a food of lower nutritional value – they’re a great addition to an already healthy diet.’

How the research was carried out 

The researchers analysed 20 studies from 10 countries conducted between 1970 and 2010.

Some 39,740 adults aged between 49 and 76 years old were included in the trial review. 

None of the participants had type 2 diabetes at the beginning of their respective studies.

The participant’s blood was tested for linoleic and arachidonic acid, which are markers of omega-6. 

‘Simple change in diet might protect people from type 2 diabetes’ 

Results suggest eating a handful of nuts a day could prevent type 2 diabetes.

Nuts, as well as soybean, sunflower and seed oils, contain omega-6, which is converted to linoleic acid when digested.

People with the highest levels of linoleic acid are 35 per cent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest amounts.  

Arachidonic acid levels are not associated with an increased or decreased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Dr Wu said: ‘Our findings suggest that a simple change in diet might protect people from developing type 2 diabetes which has reached alarming levels around the world.’

‘Those [participants] who had the highest levels of blood omega-6 markers had a much lower chance of developing type 2 diabetes.’

Previous research reveals linoleic acid may prevent type 2 diabetes by improving fat metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Linoleic acid cannot be produced in the body and needs to be taken in via food.

Dr Wu adds the findings contradict previous research that omega-6 may cause inflammation and lead to heart disease.  

The findings were published in the journal The Lancet Diabetes Endocrinology. 

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