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Healthy habits could be hindering your fitness goals

 

Those on a weight loss journey often take up and try to maintain certain habits which they think will help them to get the figure they’ve always dreamed of.

But while you might think weighing yourself consistently and saying no to eating out with friends would make you slim down, one expert has revealed that these habits might in fact be hindering your health goals.

Australian dietitian and nutritionist, Lyndi Cohen, opened up about the subject on her blog – and if you’re a dieter, what she has to say might surprise you. 

Australian dietitian and nutritionist, Lyndi Cohen (pictured), recently opened up about the so-called 'healthy' habits which might be hindering your weight loss goals 

Australian dietitian and nutritionist, Lyndi Cohen (pictured), recently opened up about the so-called 'healthy' habits which might be hindering your weight loss goals 

Australian dietitian and nutritionist, Lyndi Cohen (pictured), recently opened up about the so-called ‘healthy’ habits which might be hindering your weight loss goals 

Some of them - such as weighing yourself regularly or avoiding eating out with friends - might surprise you (pictured: Lyndi Cohen)

Some of them - such as weighing yourself regularly or avoiding eating out with friends - might surprise you (pictured: Lyndi Cohen)

Some of them – such as weighing yourself regularly or avoiding eating out with friends – might surprise you (pictured: Lyndi Cohen)

WEIGHING YOURSELF

Countless men and women trying to lose weight consider the scales to be the holy grail of a slimline figre – but according to Ms Cohen, you don’t need to weigh yourself. Ever:

‘Weighing yourself may make it harder to find your healthiest weight in the long term,’ she writes on her blog. 

‘Have you noticed how seeing a number that you didn’t want on the scale can throw you into a spin and actually demotivate you?’.

Instead, Ms Cohen recommends you get rid of your scales altogether – or, if you feel you have to check up on your weight, restrict it to once a week or once a month.

‘Feel the difference instead,’ she said.

Ms Cohen said weighing yourself is de-motivating: 'Have you noticed how seeing a number that you didn't want on the scale can throw you into a spin?', she wrote (stock image)

Ms Cohen said weighing yourself is de-motivating: 'Have you noticed how seeing a number that you didn't want on the scale can throw you into a spin?', she wrote (stock image)

Ms Cohen said weighing yourself is de-motivating: ‘Have you noticed how seeing a number that you didn’t want on the scale can throw you into a spin?’, she wrote (stock image)

WAKING UP AND CHECKING YOUR PHONE

For so many people, the first thing we reach for when our alarm goes off is our phones. In fact, too often our phones are our alarm clocks.

‘Don’t sleep with your phone next to your bed. Invest in an alarm clock to wake you up. This is one of the best things I did to help reduce my anxiety,’ Ms Cohen said.

‘Nowadays, I wake up, make a coffee, run to the beach, do a fun circuit, get a green juice, walk home and only then, an hour after waking up, when I’m sitting at my desk and able to action things, do I check my phone.’

The dietitian applies the same rule at bedtime, charging her phone in a totally different room. 

‘Social media stops an hour before bed. It’s made such a difference,’ she said.

Lyndi Cohen said you should stop charging your phone in the same room which you sleep in - and avoid checking it as soon as you wake up (stock image)

Lyndi Cohen said you should stop charging your phone in the same room which you sleep in - and avoid checking it as soon as you wake up (stock image)

Lyndi Cohen said you should stop charging your phone in the same room which you sleep in – and avoid checking it as soon as you wake up (stock image)

'Nowadays, I wake up, make a coffee, run to the beach, do a fun circuit, get a green juice, walk home and only then, an hour after waking up, when I'm sitting at my desk and able to action things, do I check my phone,' she said (pictured)

'Nowadays, I wake up, make a coffee, run to the beach, do a fun circuit, get a green juice, walk home and only then, an hour after waking up, when I'm sitting at my desk and able to action things, do I check my phone,' she said (pictured)

‘Nowadays, I wake up, make a coffee, run to the beach, do a fun circuit, get a green juice, walk home and only then, an hour after waking up, when I’m sitting at my desk and able to action things, do I check my phone,’ she said (pictured)

FULL-TIME CLEAN EATING

Eating healthily is part and parcel of losing weight in a sustainable fashion. 

But eating clean 100 per cent of the time? It’s a thumbs down from the expert.

‘If you feel anxious when someone asks you out for a meal because you’re not sure what you’ll be able to eat or you lie in bed at night worrying about what you ate that day, then you have tipped over into unhealthy relationship with food,’ Ms Cohen said.

‘You should never feel guilty after eating and you shouldn’t obsess about food.’

Ms Cohen says this is possible when you quit aiming for perfection and instead strive for balance.

Eating clean 100 per cent of the time isn't feasible - Ms Cohen said you shouldn't be obsessive and shouldn't say no to eating out with friends (stock image)

Eating clean 100 per cent of the time isn't feasible - Ms Cohen said you shouldn't be obsessive and shouldn't say no to eating out with friends (stock image)

Eating clean 100 per cent of the time isn’t feasible – Ms Cohen said you shouldn’t be obsessive and shouldn’t say no to eating out with friends (stock image)

COUNTING MACROS

Macronutrients – or figuring out the exact proportions of carbs, fat and protein you should be eating each day – is the trendy way to diet right now.

But Ms Cohen believes it can do more harm than good.

‘Just like counting calories will make you obsess, counting macros is a diet and a sure fire way to build an unhealthy relationship with food,’ she said.

‘I’ve seen how easy is it to drift into disordered eating.’

Ms Cohen – who has been overweight and on numerous diets herself – now avoids counting ‘calories, macros or almonds’. 

She instead eats intuitively, and listens to what her body needs and wants.

Ms Cohen - who has been overweight and on numerous diets herself - now avoids counting 'calories, macros or almonds'. She instead eats intuitively (pictured) 

Ms Cohen - who has been overweight and on numerous diets herself - now avoids counting 'calories, macros or almonds'. She instead eats intuitively (pictured) 

Ms Cohen – who has been overweight and on numerous diets herself – now avoids counting ‘calories, macros or almonds’. She instead eats intuitively (pictured) 

COMMENTING ON OTHER PEOPLE’S FOOD OR EATING

You might think you’re helping when you make a passing comment about someone’s weight or what they’re eating.

But in fact, all you’re doing is passing judgment.

‘Instead of motivating them to eat better, these comments will probably drive them to eat way more – but in secret where moderation doesn’t exist,’ Ms Cohen writes on her blog.

She recommends instead ‘leading by example and show them how it can be done’.

‘Unless asked explicitly it is not your job to tell other people what to eat,’ she said.

Lyndi Cohen is the creator of the 10-week Keep It Real programme. For more information, click here. 

 

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