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Indian boy is called the ‘devil’ due to his 12 inch hands

 
  • Tarik, from Uttar Pradesh, India, has had abnormally large hands since his birth
  • He has been refused admission to school in case his hands scare other students
  • Tarik used to have friends, but now has none as they think he can never be cured
  • Yet, Tarik believes his condition is curable, yet the family cannot afford therapy
  • Since his father died, Tarik is dependent on his brother to wash and dress him 

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A mysterious condition has caused a boy’s hands to grow 12 inches long.

Tarik, 12, from Uttar Pradesh, India, has had big hands since birth, which, although not diagnosed, some doctors speculate it may be Elephant Foot disease.

He is called the ‘devil’ by local villagers who believe his large hands to be the result of a curse.

As well as enduring cruel jibes from neighbours and old friends, Tarik, who works on a tea stall, has even been refused admission to school as they worry his hands will scare other students. 

Since Tarik’s father’s death, the family have been unable to afford visits to doctors to inquire about treatment. Yet, Tarik is still optimistic he will one day be cured. 

He said: ‘I want to get rid of this condition. I want to become like other kids who go to school every day and play like normal kids. I see a hope that I will get normal hands.’

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A mysterious condition has caused a boy's, 12, hands to grow 12 inches in length

A mysterious condition has caused a boy's, 12, hands to grow 12 inches in length

A mysterious condition has caused a boy’s, 12, hands to grow 12 inches in length

Tarik has had big hands since birth, which doctors speculate may be  Elephant Foot disease

Tarik has had big hands since birth, which doctors speculate may be  Elephant Foot disease

Tarik has had big hands since birth, which doctors speculate may be Elephant Foot disease

He is called the 'devil' by local villagers who believe his large hands are the result of a curse

He is called the 'devil' by local villagers who believe his large hands are the result of a curse

He is called the ‘devil’ by local villagers who believe his large hands are the result of a curse

WHAT IS ELEPHANT FOOT DISEASE? 

Elephant foot disease, also known as elephantitis, is characterised by abnormal swelling of tissues.

It is most commonly caused by a parasite carried by mosquitoes. 

The legs and genitals are usually affected, which become thick and saggy.

Excessive fluid collection causes skin to become darkened and ulcerated.

In severe cases, blood vessels can be damaged, which could be fatal.

Treatment is antibiotics to cure the parasite infection. 

Surgery is performed if the swellings are abnormally large.

Source: Disease Pictures 

‘People think this condition is a curse’ 

Tarik said: ‘I had few friends in the beginning but now I don’t have any. People are scared of my hands. I wanted to study but school refused my admission.’

He has even been labelled the ‘devil’ by villagers who believe his large hands to be the result of a curse.

Tarik said: ‘People think having this condition is a result of some curse. They don’t know it’s a medical condition and it can be cured.

‘It’s just we don’t have money for the treatment, [but that] doesn’t mean it can’t be cured.’

Tarik’s brother Hargyan, who cares for him, added: ‘The school authorities said they could not take Tarik as his huge hands will scare other kids. He was denied admission in almost every school.

‘His hands are really big. I have never seen such big hands in my life. He is stuck in his life. He cant even change his clothes. I have to look after Tarik.

‘Its difficult for Tarik to complete his daily chores like bathing, dressing and eating.’   

He has been refused admission to school as they worry his hands will scare other students

He has been refused admission to school as they worry his hands will scare other students

He has been refused admission to school as they worry his hands will scare other students

Since Tarik's father's death, the family have been unable to afford visits to doctors

Since Tarik's father's death, the family have been unable to afford visits to doctors

Since Tarik’s father’s death, the family have been unable to afford visits to doctors

Despite the family's lack of money, Tarik remains optimistic that he will one day be cured

Despite the family's lack of money, Tarik remains optimistic that he will one day be cured

Despite the family’s lack of money, Tarik remains optimistic that he will one day be cured

Tarik says he used to have friends, but his peers and neighbours now make cruel jibes

Tarik says he used to have friends, but his peers and neighbours now make cruel jibes

Tarik says he used to have friends, but his peers and neighbours now make cruel jibes

As Tarik has been refused admission to school, he spend his days working on a tea stall

As Tarik has been refused admission to school, he spend his days working on a tea stall

As Tarik has been refused admission to school, he spend his days working on a tea stall

His big hands mean he struggles to do daily tasks and is dependent on his family for help

His big hands mean he struggles to do daily tasks and is dependent on his family for help

His big hands mean he struggles to do daily tasks and is dependent on his family for help

‘His life is totally dependent on us’

Yet Tarik’s aunt, Pushpa believes his condition will improve.

She said: ‘His life is totally dependent on us. We have to take care of him all the time. But I am sure he will get a better treatment.

‘When his father was alive he took him to the local doctors a lot. But his father passed away and he only has his mother now, so he can’t get any treatment.’  

Hargyan said: ‘We went to many places for his treatment. All of them were local doctors with no sophisticated equipment. We can’t afford a good hospital for him.

‘Local doctors never helped. Every single doctor suggested to get Tarik a proper treatment. But for us there is no way. He has to stay like this till we have some money for the treatment.’

On a recent visit, Dr Pawan Kumar Gandhi said: ‘Tarik’s problem is actually a mystery to us. We’ve never seen a patient with this before.

‘I have seen a few similar cases but they had Elephant Foot disease, his condition seems to be similar to that. 

‘Chances are low but nothing is impossible. In the age of science, there is lots of research, so nothing is impossible.’ 

Tarik lives with his brother Hargyan, who cares for him, including helping him to dress and eat

Tarik lives with his brother Hargyan, who cares for him, including helping him to dress and eat

Tarik lives with his brother Hargyan, who cares for him, including helping him to dress and eat

While Tarik's father was alive, they visited doctors to inquire about possible treatments

While Tarik's father was alive, they visited doctors to inquire about possible treatments

While Tarik’s father was alive, they visited doctors to inquire about possible treatments

Yet, since his passing, the family cannot afford such visits and Tarik must endure his disorder

Yet, since his passing, the family cannot afford such visits and Tarik must endure his disorder

Yet, since his passing, the family cannot afford such visits and Tarik must endure his disorder

Tarik remains optimistic that he will one day have normal hands (pictured with his uncle)

Tarik remains optimistic that he will one day have normal hands (pictured with his uncle)

Tarik remains optimistic that he will one day have normal hands (pictured with his uncle)

His aunt Pushpa also believes Tarik's condition will one day improve and he will be normal

His aunt Pushpa also believes Tarik's condition will one day improve and he will be normal

His aunt Pushpa also believes Tarik’s condition will one day improve and he will be normal

 

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