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Kazakhstan doctor removes maggots from a boy’s ear

 
  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT 
  • The unidentified boy had gone to the doctor’s surgery complaining of earache
  • Eyewitnesses could not believe it when the doctor began removing live maggots
  • He carefully pulled the grey maggots one-by-one with his surgical tweezers
  • By the time he finished there were dozens wriggling in the steel container

Stephen Matthews For Mailonline

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This is the horrific moment a doctor removed dozens of squirming live maggots from a boy’s ear.

The young boy, from Kazakhstan, had gone to the doctor’s surgery complaining of earache, local reports suggest.

But eyewitnesses, who were present for the procedure, could not believe their eyes when the doctor began removing live maggots.

He carefully pulled the grey maggots one-by-one with his tweezers and deposited them in a surgical dish.

By the time the doctor had finished there were dozens of maggots wriggling in the stainless steel container.

The young boy, from Kazakhstan, had gone to the doctor's surgery complaining of earache, local reports suggest

The young boy, from Kazakhstan, had gone to the doctor's surgery complaining of earache, local reports suggest

But eyewitnesses, who were present for the procedure, could not believe their eyes when the doctor began removing live maggots

But eyewitnesses, who were present for the procedure, could not believe their eyes when the doctor began removing live maggots

The young boy, from Kazakhstan, had gone to the doctor’s surgery complaining of earache, local reports suggest. But eyewitnesses, who were present for the procedure, could not believe their eyes when the doctor began removing live maggots

An eyewitness filmed the gruesome operation – at a doctor’s surgery in Kazakhstan – and shared it online where it is proving popular with viewers.

The maggots, each about one centimetre long, are believed to be the larvae of a bluebottle or blow fly (Calliphoridae).

Hatched into maggots 

It’s likely that after laying their larvae in his ear, they hatched into hundreds of maggots, which fed off his flesh. 

If left untreated, they could have burrowed into his brain and killed him, medical literature states. 

Aida Abdybekova, deputy director of the Kazakhstan Scientific Researching Veterinarian Institute, said the case was not unique.

She said: ‘There are cases when insects lay their eggs or larvae inside the human ear canal.’

The infestation 

WHAT IS AURAL MYASIS?

Aural myiasis is an infestation of the nose or ears with the larvae of flies.

The flies’ larvae can feed on the host’s living or dead tissue, liquid body substance, or ingested food.

People with aural myasis might experience buzzing in their ear and notice smelly discharge.

Infestations of the nose and ears are dangerous because of the possibility of penetration into the brain, the fatality rate is 8 per cent in such cases. 

The infestation is known as aural myasis – a common condition in the tropics and subtropics.

It is usually seen in children younger than 10 years of age or in debilitated individuals. 

People with aural myasis might experience buzzing in their ear and notice smelly discharge, and it can cause deafness. 

Clean homes 

People in Kazakhstan are being advised to keep their homes clean and their rubbish bins firmly closed so as not to attract flies in the hot summer months.

It is not reported what happened with the boy, whose name and age were not reported, after the larvae were removed from his ear.

Netizen ‘Rakhmet’ said: ‘This is the most disgusting thing I ever saw. Could they have eaten his brain if they were not taken out in time?’

And ‘Anna’ added: ‘Poor boy, the larvae did not appear inside his ear in one day, his parents should have been better taken care of him.’

Kazkahstan is the world’s largest landlocked country and the economic powerhouse of Central Asia because of its vast oil and gas reserves.

However, it is perhaps best know in the west for the 2006 comedy movie Borat in which Sacha Baron Coen played a fictitious Kazakh journalist. 

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