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The ultrasound scanner that plugs into a SMARTPHONE and could revolutionise medical care in third world countries

 
  • The MobiUS scanner plugs into smartphones and tablets to provide an instant scan image on the mobile device’s screen
  • American scientists who created the device believe its portability and price tag could provide a breakthrough in medical care in third world countries
  • The £7,000 device is battery-powered and can share scan images so nurses can get second opinions and remote diagnoses

06:17 EST, 15 July 2013


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06:22 EST, 15 July 2013

American scientists have invented the world’s first ultrasound scanner for smartphones, which could revolutionise healthcare in countries where the technology is not widely available.

The MobiUS scanner plugs into smartphones and tablets to provide an instant scan image on the mobile device’s screen.

Its inventors believe that the device’s portability and small price tag could provide a breakthrough in medical care in third world countries.

Scientists have invented the world's first ultrasound scanner for smartphones, which could revolutionise healthcare

Scientists have invented the world’s first ultrasound scanner for smartphones, which could revolutionise healthcare in countries where the technology is not widely available. The MobiUS scanner plugs straight into smartphones and tablets,
providing an instant scan image on the mobile device’s screen

Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to create an image of body parts to help with diagnoses.

They are best known for their use during pregnancy to see the baby in the womb but are also used to scan organs such as the heart, lungs, liver, gall bladder and breasts.

However, ultrasound scanners are usually fairly large, expensive and situated in hospitals and clinics, which could be a long distance away from the people who need them in poorer countries.

To solve these problems, scientists spent three years developing the MobiUS, which can transmit images over a mobile network or WiFi.

Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to create an image of body parts to help with diagnoses

Ultrasound scans (pictured) are best known for their use during pregnancy but are also used to scan organs. However, ultrasound scanners are usually fairly large and situated in hospitals and clinics, which could be a long distance away from the people who need them

The scanner is supplied with its own Windows tablet or smartphone, but its inventors are working on versions compatible with Apple and Android operating systems.

The MobiUS costs £7,000 compared to £60,000 for a full-size ultrasound model.

Sailesh Chutani, CEO of US creators MobiSante, said: ‘Ultrasound imaging is safe, effective and can save lives, however more than 70 per cent of the world’s population does not have access to ultrasound because it is expensive and not portable enough.

‘Devices like MobiUS enable more care to be provided outside of expensive settings like hospitals into settings that are less expensive, such as clinics and other locations where the patient needs immediate care.

‘This is key to improving access while reducing costs.’

The MobiUS scanner is supplied with its own Windows tabletThe MobiUS scanner is supplied with its own Windows tablet

The MobiUS scanner is supplied with its own Windows tablet (pictured) or smartphone, but its inventors are working on versions compatible with Apple and Android operating systems.
The portable system costs £7,000 compared to £60,000 for a full-size ultrasound model

He believes accurate and inexpensive diagnostics at the point of care is critical to reducing healthcare costs, while also improving outcomes.

Mr Chutani said that the MobiUS interface is extremely simple and can be mastered in just a few minutes.

‘MobiUS has built in network connectivity which allows easy sharing of images from the device, for storage as well as for second opinion or remote diagnosis.

‘The device starts in less than a minute and since it is battery powered, it can work off the electric grid.’

This could be extremely useful in poorer countries where power is limited or unreliable.

The company said: ‘MobiUS fuses the power and wireless connectivity of a smartphone with the internet into a game-changing diagnostic solution that is personal and accessible.’

The MobiUS interface is simple to use so that nurses, such as the one pictured, can master it in a few minutes

The MobiUS interface is simple to use so that nurses, such as the one pictured, can master it quickly. The system has built-in network connectivity that allows easy sharing of images from the device for second opinion or remote diagnosis. As it is battery powered it can work in areas without reliable power

The comments below have not been moderated.

And it can be misused in India for determination of sex of the unborn baby….

sameer
,

mumbai, India,
17/7/2013 20:49

I don’t understand the headline? Surely in the DM it should read “iphone and ipad”?

offthegrid
,

Norfolk,
17/7/2013 07:36

Looks amazing!

joan
,

Ireland,
16/7/2013 23:33

Brilliant piece of technology. Every doctor’s surgery and hospital or medical clinic worldwide should have one. In fact every individual doctor or medic with a smart phone should have one, and it should be used before any girl or woman is allowed to have an abortion so that she can see her growing baby inside her. It will also show if she is carrying twins. In the UK scans are not often carried out on women who are seeking to kill their baby by abortion but this would mean that everyone has a scan first. And if, as in some states in the USA, there is a beating heart then there is no abortion allowed.

Grace
,

Cheltenham,
16/7/2013 09:09

last year a DIY electronics geek published details of a scanner he built for 45GBP, 7000US is very expensive, Chinese manufacturers sell then at about 2000US

steve
,

darlington, United Kingdom,
16/7/2013 02:52

A medical revolution.

Old Harrovian
,

Toronto,
16/7/2013 00:18

wow! Now we are talking….

Steve
,

Amsterdam – Netherlands,
16/7/2013 00:17

now that’s a clever invention…can see a day when they will be able to,do away with the old fashioned x ray machines….cheers…

mot123
,

townsville, Australia,
15/7/2013 22:39

GREAT product ……. Loooooooooong overdue ….

Steve in Texas
,

Roscoe, United States,
15/7/2013 20:09

still vastly overpriced as per any item for medical i wonder what the REAL cost of this would be for the hardware and software i recon approx £100

robbar
,

dagenham,
15/7/2013 20:02

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