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Two-thirds of Britons not eating fish twice a week

 
  • The NHS advises that everyone should eat fish at least twice a week 
  • But a new study has found that 64 per cent of people do not meet this target 
  • Oily fish is high in omega-3 fatty acids which benefit the heart and brain
  • It also means people eat less red meat, reducing the risk of cancer 

Ben Spencer Medical Correspondent For The Daily Mail

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Two thirds of people in Britain are putting their health at risk by not eating enough fish, cancer experts have warned.

The NHS advises that everyone should eat fish at least twice a week – including one portion of oily fish such as salmon or tuna.

But 64 per cent of people do not meet this target, a poll found.

The NHS advises that everyone should eat fish at least twice a week

The NHS advises that everyone should eat fish at least twice a week

The NHS advises that everyone should eat fish at least twice a week

Fish and shellfish are good sources of vitamins and minerals and are far lower in fat than any form of meat.

Oily fish is also particularly high in omega-3 fatty acids, which have huge benefits to the heart and brain, and in vitamin D, which strengthens the bones.

Regularly eating fish also means people tend to eat less red meat, reducing the risk of cancer and heart disease.

The World Cancer Research Fund, which commissioned the YouGov poll of 2,000 adults, found that fish-eating seems to be a disappearing habit. Of those surveyed, over-55s ate the most fish, with 45 per cent consuming at least two portions a week.

And young families with children aged between five and 11 ate the least, with only 25 per cent consuming fish twice a week.

The charity is today launching its week-long Hooked on Fish campaign. Sarah Toule, its head of health information, said: ‘Fish offers many health benefits.

HOW SWEETNERS MAKE YOU FAT 

Artificial sweeteners increase the risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease, research suggests.

A wide-ranging review has found that long term use of the sweeteners – including aspartame, sucralose and stevia – may have negative effects on our metabolism and appetite, as well as our gut bacteria.

Researchers at the University of Manitoba’s George Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation reviewed 37 studies that followed more than 400,000 people for an average of ten years. The scientists said there was no consistent weight loss seen in people who took artificial sweeteners.

It has been suggested that the use of artificial sweeteners may stimulate appetite and, therefore, may play a role in weight gain. The authors noted that studies funded by industry showed a greater likelihood of subjects successfully controlling Type 2 Diabetes, suggesting bias. They noted that only seven of the 37 studies were randomised controlled trials – the gold standard. The study was published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

‘It’s high in protein and other nutrients, such as vitamin D and selenium, and it’s a great alternative to red meat. It is also one of the best sources of healthy omega-3 fats, which are essential for a healthy heart.

‘People should aim to eat fish at least twice a week including one serving of oily fish, such as salmon or herring. We have some amazing seafood from our shores – and what better time to start eating more fish than during the summer?’

The NHS recommends that pregnant women should also eat no more than two portions a week of oily fish, because it also contains traces of mercury, which can cause problems if it builds up.

Oily fish is also particularly high in omega-3 fatty acids, which have huge benefits to the heart and brain

Oily fish is also particularly high in omega-3 fatty acids, which have huge benefits to the heart and brain

Oily fish is also particularly high in omega-3 fatty acids, which have huge benefits to the heart and brain

Others are advised to have no more than four portions of oily fish a week.

Research has found that adults who regularly eat fish are less susceptible to heart attacks, strokes and deaths from heart disease.

Despite the benefits, Government figures show that our overall consumption of seafood has declined in the past ten years.

It peaked in 2006 at an average of 199 grams per person a week, equivalent to a large fillet of cod. But by 2015 it was 177g per person per week.

Experts have attributed this to a change in our shopping habits and the shrinking economy.

Many adults now avoid doing a weekly shop in a large grocery store with its own fish counter. Instead they tend to stock up a few times a week in smaller stores with less of a range.

 

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