• Survey quizzed 1,000 males on what it means to be a man in 2016
  • Coined the term alta-male to describe men rejecting traditional masculinity
  • Poll found 38% of men are cutting down on alcohol and 53% count calories
  • Three quarters said they would be happy for their partner to earn more 

Madlen Davies for MailOnline

4

View
comments

The days of blokes sitting on the sofa watching football with a can of lager in their hand are over, if new research is to be believed.

We are amidst the dawn of a new type of man, according to a survey by Coach magazine. 

Dubbed the alta-male, this new breed counts calories, avoids alcohol and wouldn’t mind if his partner earned more.

The survey quizzed 1,000 males about what it means to be a man in 2016.

It found many men are rejecting traditional stereotypes of masculinity, such as strength, toughness, instant respect and the ability to grow a moustache.

Instead, they are more interested in qualities such as friendliness, intelligence, being interesting and caring.

We are amidst the dawn of a new type of man – the alta-male – according to a survey by Coach magazine

ARE YOU AN ALTA MALE? TAKE THE TEST BELOW OR HERE 

Men’s exercise habits traditionally range from those with a beer-belly who have never set foot in a gym, to those who spends every waking hour toning their steroid-fuelled biceps.

But the survey revealed men now have a more nuanced approach to fitness.

They believe physical activity is the key to lifestyle change and feeling better about themselves, but 84 per cent would make small changes rather than a huge overhaul.

The poll showed this year, some 60 per cent of men have tried to get fitter; 53 per cent have exercised specifically to lose weight and 25 per cent have begun counting calories.

Around a quarter have started to lift weights, and roughly the same number have began running or cycling.

While in the past the pub might have been man’s natural habitat, 38 per cent have now started to cut down on alcohol. 

Instead, men may now prefer to spend their time knitting. 

The researchers noted that Yorkshire yarn company Rowan reported men account for 12 per cent of its customers, and John Lewis now offers men’s knitting classes.

Men are rejecting traditional stereotypes of masculinity and are more interested in qualities such as friendliness, intelligence, being interesting and caring, the survey found

Some 53 per cent of men have tried to lose weight in the past few years; 25 per cent started to count calories

How men view success has also changed, the poll showed.

People might assume men dream of a big house, a flashy sports car or a model girlfriend.

But only 11 per cent feel that material possessions make for a successful man. 

Around 40 per cent of those polled said their definition of success meant being a good father or husband.

And more than 75 per cent said they would change their career to spend more time with their family.

Feminists will rejoice, as a similar proportion said they would be happy for their partner to be the main breadwinner.   

In fact, only 12 per cent said they wanted to be earning lots of money in 2016. 

More men were likely to say they respected David Attenborough, their dad or Nelson Mandela than Richard Brandon or Bill Gates.

Surprisingly, only 21 per cent of men now want to be seen as attractive and only 10 per cent feel pressured to dress a certain way.  

How men view success has changed. Around 40 per cent of those polled said their definition of success meant being a good father or husband

THE QUALITIES OF AN ALTA-MALE 

This, then, is the man of 2016, the ‘Alta-male’. Can you see yourself in there?

1. Traditional masculinity is out

Our research showed fewer than one in four men want to be thought of as ‘masculine’. The Alta-male is less interested in having typically ‘masculine’ traits [strength, toughness, instant respect and the ability to grow a moustache by sundown], and is more interested in qualities such as friendliness, intelligence, being interesting and caring.

2. Experiences trump new material things

Of course, he still buys stuff – lots of it – but when buying a car, for example, he might think about its ability to transport mountain bikes, rather than whether it might make women think he’s a professional footballer.

3. He feels he has the freedom to be himself

He no longer feels the compulsion to be what society wants or expects him to be, or conform to a past stereotype or label. He’d rather connect with other people than ‘create a good impression’.

4. Success is self-defined, not what other people say it should be

See: various MasterChef contestants turning their back on years of medical training to open a macaroonery.

Alta-males want to engineer a rewarding work/life balance in which they play an active role in their children’s upbringing rather than communicating through hard cash

5. Who cares what other people think?

He’s worked out that being comfortable with who he is on the inside is more rewarding than being obsessed with outward appearance and ‘what people think’.

6. He does the things that make him happy

And those things, whether on a bicycle, on an X-box, in a record shop or an infinity of other locations are not awkward ‘hobbies’ to be vaguely ashamed of, but a confident statement of ‘this is me’.

7. Kids before career

He rejects the model of ‘a-bit-of-sport-and-loads-of-telly’ parenthood his own father favoured. The Alta-male would even be open to changing his career if it meant he could spend more time with his family.

8. There’s more to life than work

The goal is to not just progress one’s career and communicate with family members through hard cash, but to engineer a rewarding mixture of family and self.

9. Age is no barrier

Those changes don’t have to begin by making a sudden 90-degree handbrake turn, but can often be achieved by making small adjustments to his wellbeing and lifestyle, such as cutting out the After Eights, running to the first lamppost, or deciding that he’ll be the judge of whether he has another drink, not his colleagues on the sales team.

10. Improvement comes from health and exercise

When he thinks of making changes for the better, he thinks that physical activity is the key to lifestyle change and feeling better about himself.  

 

  

Most watched News videos



  • Laura Ingraham tells media at RNC: ‘Do your jobs!!!’



  • Boy smashes up $250,000 McLaren with a skateboard



  • Donald Trump’s daughter Tiffany speaks at the RNC



  • ‘She stole the show, literally’: Jimmy Fallon mocks Melania



  • Terrifying moment Syrian rebel uses grenade to blow up tank



  • Man in Austin slides off a water slide and into a rocky cliff



  • Michelle Obama and Melania Trump’s speeches side-by-side



  • RNC crowd boo Ted Cruz as Trump arrives in arena



  • Watch Navy frigate destroyed by missiles and torpedos



  • Ted Cruz ends speech with no Trump endorsement



  • Execution-style murder video released by San Jose Police



  • Coalition aircraft destroy ISIS fighting positions in Syria


Comments (4)

Share what you think

The comments below have not been moderated.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Find out now