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HEALTH NOTES: Therapy can help couples to conceive 

 

HEALTH NOTES: Therapy can help couples to conceive

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Therapy can help anxious would-be parents to conceive, researchers have suggested.

Stress is known to contribute to hormonal problems, which in turn can interfere with reproductive health.

Canadian experts looked at 50 studies investigating the impact of psychological interventions on fertility. Mindfulness, counselling and cognitive behavioural therapy, or talking therapy, were assessed as potential stress-relievers for couples hoping for a baby.

Overall, the researchers noted a 25 per cent increased chance in conceiving in those who underwent therapy.

Canadian researchers noted a 25 per cent increased chance in conceiving in those who underwent therapy Canadian researchers noted a 25 per cent increased chance in conceiving in those who underwent therapy

Canadian researchers noted a 25 per cent increased chance in conceiving in those who underwent therapy

Just a third of Britons say they walk every day during winter.

Worryingly, one in ten say that they do not walk anywhere at all.

The research, carried out by the military support charity Walking With The Wounded, also found that Britons were more likely to watch television on Christmas Day than go for a walk.

However, two-thirds of the 2,000 people polled said they were keen to start exercising more often.

The NHS recommends all adults walk for at least ten minutes every day to maintain a healthy weight and improve heart health.

Just a third of Britons say they walk every day during winter. Worryingly, one in ten say that they do not walk anywhere at all Just a third of Britons say they walk every day during winter. Worryingly, one in ten say that they do not walk anywhere at all

Just a third of Britons say they walk every day during winter. Worryingly, one in ten say that they do not walk anywhere at all

A fifth of Britons wrongly believe that veganism can cure cancer, according to a poll.

The strict diet has been linked to lower rates of heart disease, but a reduced risk of cancer has not been proven in studies.

A survey of 2,000 people by the charity Pancreatic Cancer Action also found that three-quarters could not name a single symptom of the disease, while 90 per cent said they would suspect cancer only if they found a lump.

Usually pancreatic cancer involves loss of appetite, feeling sick or pain in the stomach and back. Ali Stunt, founder and chief executive of Pancreatic Cancer Action, said: ‘Most pancreatic cancer patients are diagnosed too late. We need to improve the public’s awareness of symptoms.’

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