How ADHD diagnoses among kids have not increased during the pandemic Covid


Claims that ADHD diagnoses have increased during the pandemic are untrue, a study suggests.

Researchers, who examined US data on the number of children with the conduct disorder, found that the numbers remained stable between 2017 and 2022.

The results showed that around a tenth of young people were diagnosed with the condition, which did not represent a ‘significant risk’ in recent years.

The findings challenge widely held views that cases rose during the Covid crisis, when TikTok videos detailing the condition’s supposed symptoms racked up millions of views among susceptible teenagers.

Doctors feared that this would lead to an increase in the number of incorrect ADHD diagnoses and that young people would use unnecessary medications.

Researchers, who examined US data on the number of children with the conduct disorder, found that the numbers remained stable between 2017 and 2022

Fascinating graphs show how the number of ADHD prescriptions in England has increased over time, with the demographic shift of the patient population from children to adults, with young women in particular now driving the increase.

Fascinating graphs show how the number of ADHD prescriptions in England has increased over time, with the demographic shift of the patient population from children to adults, with young women in particular now driving the increase.

Top psychiatrists have previously shared their concerns that people using TikTok to detail their alleged ADHD symptoms could cause an increase in the number of people seeking a diagnosis because they think they have the condition – despite not having really have symptoms.

Top psychiatrists have previously shared their concerns that people using TikTok to detail their alleged ADHD symptoms could cause an increase in the number of people seeking a diagnosis because they think they have the condition – despite not having really have symptoms.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a condition that affects behavior.

Symptoms, such as restlessness, concentration problems and impulsive behavior, are usually noticed at an early age.

Previous research has shown that the prevalence of ADHD among children in the US increased from 6.1 percent in 1997 to 10.2 percent in 2016.

However, no study has provided more up-to-date figures, according to researchers from the Department of Child and Adolescent Health at Guangdong Pharmaceutical University in China.

What is ADHD?

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a behavioral disorder defined by inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.

It affects about five percent of children in the US. In Great Britain, about 3.6 percent of boys and 0.85 percent of girls suffer from this.

Symptoms usually appear at an early age and become more apparent as the child grows. These may also include:

  • Constant fidgeting
  • Poor concentration
  • Excessive movement or talking
  • Act without thinking
  • Inability to cope with stress
  • Little or no sense of danger
  • Careless mistakes
  • Mood swings
  • Forgetfulness
  • Difficulty organizing tasks
  • Constantly starting new tasks before finishing old ones
  • Inability to listen or carry out instructions

Most cases are diagnosed between six and twelve years of age. Adults can also suffer from it, but there is less research into this.

The exact cause of ADHD is unclear, but it is believed to involve genetic mutations that affect a person’s brain function and structure.

Premature babies and babies with epilepsy or brain damage are at greater risk.

ADHD is also linked to anxiety, depression, insomnia, Tourette’s and epilepsy.

There is no medicine.

A combination of medication and therapy is usually recommended to relieve symptoms and make daily life easier.

Source: NHS choices

In an effort to estimate ADHD prevalence from 2017 to 2022, they analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey – an annual survey of approximately 35,000 US households – where participants report any ADHD diagnoses in their children.

Results, published in the journal JAMA NetworkResearch shows that of the 37,609 young people aged four to seventeen who participated in the study, 4,098 were diagnosed with ADHD.

This amounted to 10.2 percent of children in 2017/18, 10.1 percent in 2019/20 and 10.5 percent in 2021/22.

The researchers concluded that this did not represent a ‘significant change’ from 2017 levels.

By comparison, according to ADHD UK, only around five percent of children in Britain are thought to be diagnosed with it.

The team noted that diagnoses varied by age, gender, race and ethnicity, and the ratio of household income to poverty, which was consistent with previous findings.

For example, people between the ages of 12 and 17 were twice as likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than people between the ages of 4 and 7, while diagnoses among boys were twice as high as among girls.

The results were based on parents responding to a survey, so the numbers may contain some inaccuracies, the researchers noted.

The questionnaire had also been redesigned in 2019 and data collection was paused in 2020, which could have affected the results, she added.

However, the results do not reflect the increase expected by many physicians.

Top psychiatrists have previously shared their concerns that people using TikTok to detail their alleged ADHD symptoms could cause an increase in the number of people seeking a diagnosis because they think they have the condition – despite not having really have symptoms.

They warned that the trend, which generated billions of views on the app, made so-called neurodivergent conditions “something you could aspire to” and claimed patients were seeking private diagnoses.

What exactly causes ADHD is unclear, but it is believed to involve genetic mutations that affect a person’s brain function and structure.

Premature babies and children with epilepsy or brain damage are thought to be at greater risk.

ADHD is also linked to other conditions such as anxiety, depression, insomnia, Tourette’s and epilepsy.

There is no cure, but a combination of medication and therapy is usually recommended to relieve symptoms and make everyday life easier.