• Antioxidants in fresh foods help the body produce healthy red blood cells
  • People who do not eat enough of these create cells that are damaged
  • Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide from the body 

Rory Tingle For Mailonline

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Burger fans could be more at risk of cancer than vegetarians because junk food damages blood cells.

People who do not eat enough antioxidants – which are found in fresh foods – produce red bloods cells that are damaged, scientists at Swansea University found. 

These cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the body’s tissues, and remove waste carbon dioxide, making them a vital part of human wellbeing.

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Burger fans could be more at risk of cancer than vegetarians because junk food damages blood cells

Examining red blood cells provides a useful indicator about someone’s health, The Sunday Times reported.  

Dr Hasan Haboubi, a gastroenterologist and cancer researcher, said: ‘We have found that life­style, and especially diet, is intimately linked to the health of our tiniest cells.

‘If we have a bad diet it is rapidly reflected in the state of those cells.’ 

Dr Haboubi studied red blood cells, which are created by stem cells in the bone marrow.

As stem cells move all around the body they are affected by a lots of lifestyle factors including diet, exercise and exposure to radiation. 

If these are mutated, faulty blood cells are created. 

People who do not eat enough antioxidants – which are found in fresh foods – produce red bloods cells that are damaged, scientists at Swansea University found

A healthy person should have no more than three to five cells that have mutated per million. 

People who eat low levels of fruit and vegetables had more than double the mutation rate.  

The findings were revealed when Dr Haboubi was trying to develop a blood test for cancer.

NEW TREATMENT TO PRESERVE THE FERTILITY OF WOMEN WITH CANCER

Women and girls with cancer in Britain are now able to have groundbreaking treatment to preserve their fertility after the ravages of chemotherapy and radiotherapy – on the NHS.

Three NHS centres are offering ovarian tissue cryopreservation, a procedure that involves removing and then freezing healthy ovarian tissue containing eggs before the start of cancer treatment that is lifesaving but can permanently damage the reproductive system.

Women and girls with cancer in Britain are now able to have groundbreaking treatment to preserve their fertility after the ravages of chemotherapy and radiotherapy – on the NHS

Once a patient has finished their treatment and is either in remission or of childbearing age, the ovarian tissue is thawed and re-implanted in an ovary or the lining of the womb. 

The woman can then try to conceive naturally, as the implanted strips begin producing healthy eggs. Re-implanting healthy ovarian tissue can also help prevent premature menopause, another side-effect of some cancer treatments.

Currently, women may be offered the opportunity to freeze individual eggs if chemotherapy or radiotherapy is likely to damage fertility.

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