Militant BMA member who pushed for doctor strikes thinks Britain is a ‘white supremacist patriarchy’


A militant trainee doctor who has pushed for a series of devastating NHS strikes thinks we live in a ‘white supremacist patriarchy’, it was revealed today.

Kayode Oki sits on the governing council of the British Medical Association, which has spent months plotting strikes that have stalled the ailing health service’s push for a 35 per cent pay rise.

He has also personally attacked fellow physicians for their “willingness to support white supremacist rhetoric” on Twitter, claiming that those of Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds “are sometimes the biggest white supremacists out there.”

Dr. Oki, a first-year doctor-in-training, describes herself as a “socialist troublemaker,” according to The Sun.

And according to unearthed tweets from 2021, he’s also said that white women “scare me.”

Kayode Oki sits on the governing council of the British Medical Association, which has spent months plotting strikes that have stalled the ailing health service in its push for a 35 per cent pay rise

Kayode Oki sits on the governing council of the British Medical Association, which has spent months plotting strikes that have stalled the ailing health service in its push for a 35 per cent pay rise

Dr. Oki, a first-year doctor-in-training, calls herself a 'socialist troublemaker', according to The Sun

Dr. Oki, a first-year doctor-in-training, calls herself a 'socialist troublemaker', according to The Sun

Dr. Oki, a first-year doctor-in-training, calls herself a ‘socialist troublemaker’, according to The Sun

He also tweeted that he refuses to “listen to podcasts or read books by white men,” that “racism is a rite of passage for white teens,” and that “we exist under” a “cis-white patriarchy.”

Dr. Oki, a voting member of the 69-member BMA council, told the paper: “I am disappointed that these comments, which are my personal opinion, are being taken without the context such complex subjects deserve.”

MailOnline approached Dr. Oki through the BMA.

A BMA spokesman said: ‘Dr. Oki is immediately relieved of participation in all BMA cases and the BMA will conduct an external independent investigation.”

His comments have sparked anger among Tory MPs.

Conservative MP Ben Bradley told MailOnline today: ‘This is utter nonsense and shows how divisive the BMA’s governing council really is.

“If he wants to understand the ‘cis-white patriarchy,’ he needs to talk to the guys from Mansfield who’ve spent their lives grafting to keep the lights on for others.”

He added: “The BMA leadership must stop making radical comments like this, stop making it all about race and continue to end the strikes.”

He has also tweeted that he refuses to

He has also tweeted that he refuses to

He has also tweeted that he refuses to “listen to podcasts or read books by white men,” that “racism is a rite of passage for white teens,” and that “we exist under” a “cis-white patriarchy.” Pictured is Dr Oki (right) on the first day of the strike by young doctors in London on March 13

Dr. Oki, who studied at the University of Dundee, is now a junior year doctor at South Thames in London. He previously served as Deputy Chairman of the BMA's Medical Students Committee, where he was responsible for the committee's educational work

Dr. Oki, who studied at the University of Dundee, is now a junior year doctor at South Thames in London. He previously served as Deputy Chairman of the BMA's Medical Students Committee, where he was responsible for the committee's educational work

Dr. Oki, who studied at the University of Dundee, is now a junior year doctor at South Thames in London. He previously served as Deputy Chairman of the BMA’s Medical Students Committee, where he was responsible for the committee’s educational work

He has also personally attacked fellow doctors for their

He has also personally attacked fellow doctors for their

He has also personally attacked fellow doctors for their “willingness to support white supremacist rhetoric on Twitter”

Dr. Oki also claimed that those from Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds are

Dr. Oki also claimed that those from Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds are

Dr. Oki also claimed that those from Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds are “sometimes the biggest champions of white supremacy”

According to unearthed tweets from 2021, he has also accused white women of being 'scary' and stealing ideas from black people

According to unearthed tweets from 2021, he has also accused white women of being 'scary' and stealing ideas from black people

According to unearthed tweets from 2021, he has also accused white women of being ‘scary’ and stealing ideas from black people

His comments have sparked anger among Conservative MPs who denounced the 'divisive' BMA for promoting Mr Oki's 'radical remarks'.

His comments have sparked anger among Conservative MPs who denounced the 'divisive' BMA for promoting Mr Oki's 'radical remarks'.

His comments have sparked anger among Conservative MPs who denounced the ‘divisive’ BMA for promoting Mr Oki’s ‘radical remarks’.

The junior doctor has also appeared as a panelist on the British Medical Journal's Sharp Scratch podcast for medical students and junior doctors

The junior doctor has also appeared as a panelist on the British Medical Journal's Sharp Scratch podcast for medical students and junior doctors

The junior doctor has also appeared as a panelist on the British Medical Journal’s Sharp Scratch podcast for medical students and junior doctors

It comes after MailOnline revealed this week that another medical student fervently pushing for NHS strikes had missed last week’s four-day walkout – as she was recovering from a private liposuction.

Eilidh Garrett has spent months encouraging junior doctors through her influential social media presence, attacking the government for its lack of “moral decency”, behavior during strike talks and refusal to concede on wages.

The 26-year-old has yet to qualify as a physician assistant, believes they earn more than 35 percent – the huge amount demanded by the BMA.

She has also previously told her followers that she only wanted to become a doctor for the money.

But unlike Dr Oki, Miss Garrett is studying medicine, which means she cannot legally take industrial action as she has no contract with the NHS.

Still, she’s been hugely vocal in promoting the walkouts, racking up millions of views on her pro-strike Twitter posts, and attending a past picket line in support.

Dr. Oki, who studied at the University of Dundee, is now a junior year doctor at South Thames in London.

Eilidh Garrett has spent months encouraging junior doctors through her influential social media presence, attacking the government for its lack of 'moral decency', behavior during strike talks and refusal to concede on wages

Eilidh Garrett has spent months encouraging junior doctors through her influential social media presence, attacking the government for its lack of 'moral decency', behavior during strike talks and refusal to concede on wages

Eilidh Garrett has spent months encouraging junior doctors through her influential social media presence, attacking the government for its lack of ‘moral decency’, behavior during strike talks and refusal to concede on wages

He previously served as deputy chair of the BMA’s Medical Students Committee, where he was responsible for the committee’s educational work.

The junior doctor has also appeared as a panelist on the British Medical Journal’s Sharp Scratch podcast for medical students and junior doctors.

Last week’s junior doctors’ strike, organized in the hope that ministers would give in to wage demands, was called the worst in the NHS’s 75-year history.

It led to the cancellation of more than 200,000 appointments and procedures across the healthcare system.

After five years of medical school — or four years for an entry-level graduate program — students become junior doctors.

Basic salaries for junior doctors, who can remain in the position for up to ten years before reaching a higher title, can be as high as £58,000 a year.

But in their first year – known as foundation doctor year one – they can expect to earn just over £29,000 a year.

The BMA is seeking a 35 percent pay increase to address the 26 percent real pay cut young doctors have faced over the past 15 years.

It has maintained it was “willing to negotiate,” but talks have so far failed.

Health Secretary Steve Barclay has repeatedly emphasized that the demand is prohibitively expensive.

If ministers conceded, some young medics would be paid more than £20,000.

Meanwhile, the NHS is threatening legal action against striking nurses, arguing that the second day of their planned strike next month would be ‘illegitimate’.

NHS employers wrote to the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) yesterday, warning they have no legal mandate to authorize union action in England on May 2.

It means the health service and the nurses’ union could face a clash in the Supreme Court over whether the unprecedented strike can go ahead.

Pat Cullen, CEO of the RCN, announced last week that there will be a 48-hour strike from April 30 at 8 p.m. to May 2 at 8 p.m., after the union rejected the government’s wage offer. It will see thousands of nurses walk away from ER, intensive care units and cancer wards for the first time in the increasingly bitter dispute.

Insiders fear the nurses could coordinate future strikes with junior doctors, which would be devastating for the NHS.