Science has validated a miraculous new treatment for hay fever: A portable gizmo zaps LIGHT up your nose.


Researchers now believe a groundbreaking device known as the LumiMed nasal device could dramatically improve the way people treat allergic rhinitis (AR), commonly known as hay fever
Millions of people who suffer from hay fever could benefit greatly from a portable gadget that does nasal zapping.

Unapproved in the US or the UK, Lumimed advertises that it will “liberate” you from pollen-related problems.

According to recent studies, it helped 20 patients feel better while they had the flu.

The device’s creators, which include a physician who established an allergy clinic, are optimistic that the device will eventually be approved due to the positive outcomes.

The Lumimed fits into a charging station and has an electric shaver-like appearance.

Researchers now believe a groundbreaking device known as the LumiMed nasal device could dramatically improve the way people treat allergic rhinitis (AR), commonly known as hay fever

It uses light therapy to inhibit the release of histamine, natural chemicals made in response to pollen entering the body.

This flooding causes the telltale symptoms of hay fever, including a runny nose and watery eyes.

It also causes the mucous membranes to become inflamed.

The Lumimed gadget also reduces this inflammation and works effectively as a natural antihistamine – drugs used by millions to banish their hay fever woes.

What does it do? And how quickly can it have an effect? Everything you need to know about the LumiMed? Nasal Device

What is it?

The LumiMed Nasal Device is a handheld device that treats AR through light therapy.

It resembles an electric shaver and is placed in a charging station.

This inhibits the release of histamine, natural chemicals made in response to pollen entering the body.

The light also reduces inflammation and acts effectively as a natural antihistamine.

How does it work?

The device contains a light-emitting diode that creates red light between a wavelength of 650 and 690 nm.

Patients insert it into their nostrils and light comes out through an optically clear cone at the tip of the device.

How fast can it act?

The device emits light as soon as a trigger button is pressed.

After ten seconds it beeps and switches off automatically.

Patients are asked to use the equipment for 10 seconds per nostril. This should be repeated twice a day.

It emits light as soon as a trigger button is pressed. After ten seconds it beeps and switches off automatically.

The technology, known as photobiomodulation ? or low-level laser therapy ? is already being used to repair tissue and relieve pain.

Scientists are even considering using similar red light technology in the ongoing battle against depression and Alzheimer’s disease.

Twenty patients with allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, were given the Lumimed device to use during ‘high allergy season’.

Each used the equipment twice a day.

After 10 days, participants were asked to record whether or not their symptoms had improved, rating nasal secretions, nasal congestion, and nasal itching or sneezing on a scale of zero to three.

These scores were then compared to scores given before they started using the device.

Volunteers were also asked about the comfort and ease of use of the device.

Researchers found that all 20 patients experienced an improvement in their total nasal symptom score — the numbers from all three measures combined — after using the device.

Of them, 40 percent reduced their total nasal symptom score to zero.

Some 19 participants out of 20 found the device pleasant to use, while 17 said it was ‘easy to use’.

“Lumimed offers a non-drug alternative for patients seeking symptom relief,” concluded researchers led by Lumimed founder Dr. Denis Bouboulis.

‘There are no known side effects of this treatment device.’

However, similar photobiomodulation technology has previously reported risks, including premature aging of the skin or temporary headaches caused by the light.

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen – a fine powder that comes from plants, trees and grass.

About 10 million people in Britain and nearly 20 million in the US are estimated to suffer in Britain.

In the UK, manufacturers are required to register their medical devices with the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), which monitors the safety of medicines used in the UK before they are marketed.

It told MailOnline it “has the authority to remove medical devices if we believe they are unsafe, but does not ‘approve medical devices in our regulatory role.’

About 20 patients -- 11 women and nine men -- with allergic rhinitis were given the LumiMed nasal device during

About 20 patients — 11 women and nine men — with allergic rhinitis were given the LumiMed nasal device during “high allergy season,” the scientists said. Each patient used the equipment for 10 seconds per nostril, twice a day, emitting a wavelength of 650 nm light energy each time

They added: ‘Our role includes operating the UK Medical Device Vigilance System.’

Similarly, the Food and Drug Administration regulates the sale of products in the US and oversees the safety of all regulated medical products.

It comes after pollen levels surpassed ‘very high’ levels across the country over the weekend, causing misery for millions trying to make the most of the UK’s Caribbean heat wave.

Officials have warned that the ‘pollen bomb’ is expected to last this weekend and next week – with every part of England on red alert until Saturday.

Earlier this week, NHS England also revealed that there were 122,650 visits to the hay fever section of its website last week, nearly 100,000 more than the 35,000 it received in the first week of May.

The millions of Britons who suffer from severe hay fever, as well as asthma and other lung problems, are being urged to take precautions, including taking medicines regularly, always carrying their inhaler and calling their GP or 911 if their symptoms worsen.

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