She misdiagnosed her “freckle” as eczema before realizing it was stage-four cancer.


A mother of three was shocked to discover that a freckle on her face was stage four cancer.

A mother was shocked to find out that a freckle on her face was stage four cancer.

Kay Wootten, from Romford in London, claims doctors initially attributed the mark, which appeared in 2018, to eczema.

The 57-year-old was prescribed steroids and moisturizers to treat what was thought to be a skin condition – before a June 2022 biopsy revealed the cancer.

After the examination, the retired doctor’s assistant and mother of three was diagnosed with stage four melanoma.

She is now undergoing 12 months of chemotherapy and has had to undergo surgery to prevent the disease from spreading further.

A mother of three was shocked to discover that a freckle on her face was stage four cancer.

Kay Wootten was prescribed steroids and moisturizers to treat the thought of a skin condition - before a June 2022 biopsy revealed the cancer

Kay Wootten was prescribed steroids and moisturizers to treat the thought of a skin condition – before a June 2022 biopsy revealed the cancer

Kay said, “All of this could have been avoided if they had just listened to me when things started to change.

“My whole life has completely changed – I’m trying to joke about it, but it’s really let me down.”

Kay said she first noticed the mark on her face in August 2018.

During the lockdown, her symptoms worsened and the freckle began to grow, itch and bleed – but she claims doctors insisted it was eczema.

In 2021 she was prescribed steroids and moisturizers which she used to no avail before finally putting her foot down in 2022 and pushing for a referral to a dermatologist.

Kay was then diagnosed with stage four melanoma and has since undergone surgery and more than a year of chemotherapy.

The 57-year-old is now undergoing 12 months of chemotherapy after first noticing the mark in 2018

The 57-year-old is now undergoing 12 months of chemotherapy after first noticing the mark in 2018

Kay from Romford had surgery to prevent the disease from spreading further

Kay claims she feels

Kay from Romford had surgery to prevent the disease from spreading further

She said: ‘The first surgery I had was to remove the primary tumor and then they realized that the margins around the tumor were not clear and there were still cancer cells in it.

“I had more removed and the edges still weren’t clear — I’ve had four cheek lifts in front of and below my ear and had a lymph node removed as well.

“I also had my thyroid removed because it tested positive for melanoma.”

Kay claims she feels “sick all the time” and “can’t do anything” because of chemotherapy.

She added: “I feel like next year will be a complete waste if they can’t get rid of it.

“You don’t realize how much of an impact it has on your family, too. It’s not just you involved, it’s your kids and that’s why you miss so much.’

Kay’s medical center and NHS North East London were approached for comment.

WHAT DO CANCER MILLS LOOK LIKE? CHECKING IS AS EASY AS ABCDE

The more moles a person has, the greater the risk of developing melanoma.

The following ABCDE guidelines can help people identify moles that may need to be seen by a doctor.

asymmetry

Watch out for moles with an irregular shape.

Check for asymmetrical moles with an irregular shape

Check for asymmetrical moles with an irregular shape

Borders

Check for jagged edges.

People should watch out for moles with irregular borders and jagged edges

People should watch out for moles with irregular borders and jagged edges

Cchange color

If a mole changes color or is a different color in one part than the other, seek medical advice.

Moles that change color or are a different color should be looked at

Moles that change color or are a different color should be looked at

Ddiameter

Any increase in size should be monitored, but be especially careful of moles that grow more than about 6mm in width.

Any change in size should be checked, but more than 6mm in diameter is very concerning

Any change in size should be checked, but more than 6mm in diameter is very concerning

Eelevation

The E section is generally classified as ‘elevation’; warning to watch out for moles emerging from the surface, especially if it is irregular.

Still, Dr. David Fisher, director of the melanoma program at Massachusetts General Hospital, explains that many dermatologists have different classifications for this.

His preferred word is “evolve.”

Dr. Fisher previously told MailOnline, “Is it changing? Notice anything suspicious or concerning? That’s the key.’

Watch out for moles that have grown up or that 'evolve' over time

Watch out for moles that have grown up or that’evolve in time

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