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Expert Olivia Arezzolo reveals why getting only six hours of sleep is impacting your health

 

The shocking impact having only six hours sleep has on your body – and how to fix it today

  • Sleep has an effect on everything, from your physical energy to stress levels
  • It impacts your emotional wellbeing, health and anxiety levels as well as skin
  • Those who sleep for six hours a night are four times more likely to get a cold
  • Sleep expert Olivia Arezzolo shared the 10-step bedtime routine she follows 

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If you are guilty of only getting only six hours sleep a night, you are four times more likely to get a cold, a leading sleep expert has revealed.

Olivia Arezzolo, from Sydney, said there is a huge connection between sleep and your health.

It affects everything from memory to cognitive function, stress levels, emotional wellbeing and even our skin and overall health.

Olivia Arezzolo (pictured), from Sydney, said there is a huge connection between sleep and your health; it affects everything from your cognitive function to stress levels and emotional wellbeing Olivia Arezzolo (pictured), from Sydney, said there is a huge connection between sleep and your health; it affects everything from your cognitive function to stress levels and emotional wellbeing

Olivia Arezzolo (pictured), from Sydney, said there is a huge connection between sleep and your health; it affects everything from your cognitive function to stress levels and emotional wellbeing

Without seven or eight hours each night, you can expect physical, mental and emotional knock-on effects. 

‘For our physical energy levels, sleep is vital,’ Olivia told The Beauty Chef. 

‘Some 70 per cent of hGh (human growth hormone) is produced in deep sleep, which is not only responsible for skin health, but every single cell in the body. 

‘This, with inadequate repair time, you are likely to wake feeling worn out and exhausted.’ 

Without seven or eight hours each night, you can expect physical, mental and emotional knock-on effects, Olivia (pictured) said Without seven or eight hours each night, you can expect physical, mental and emotional knock-on effects, Olivia (pictured) said

Without seven or eight hours each night, you can expect physical, mental and emotional knock-on effects, Olivia (pictured) said

Olivia said that when we sleep, our brains ‘detoxify’ from a neurotoxin that can otherwise lead to brain fog, memory loss and even Alzheimer’s disease. 

‘Emotionally, after one night of insufficient sleep, the stress hormone cortisol can increase up to 37 per cent, leaving us feeling wired, anxious and on edge,’ she said.

The long-term impact of not enough sleep is even worse, from a 45 per cent increase in risk of cardiovascular disease to type two diabetes and anxiety disorders. 

'Emotionally, after one night of insufficient sleep, the stress hormone cortisol can increase up to 37 per cent, leaving us feeling wired, anxious and on edge,' Olivia (pictured) said 'Emotionally, after one night of insufficient sleep, the stress hormone cortisol can increase up to 37 per cent, leaving us feeling wired, anxious and on edge,' Olivia (pictured) said 'Emotionally, after one night of insufficient sleep, the stress hormone cortisol can increase up to 37 per cent, leaving us feeling wired, anxious and on edge,' Olivia (pictured) said 'Emotionally, after one night of insufficient sleep, the stress hormone cortisol can increase up to 37 per cent, leaving us feeling wired, anxious and on edge,' Olivia (pictured) said

‘Emotionally, after one night of insufficient sleep, the stress hormone cortisol can increase up to 37 per cent, leaving us feeling wired, anxious and on edge,’ Olivia (pictured) said

But it is easy to take charge of your sleep and work on making up for any sleep debt if you know how, Olivia said.

Previously, Olivia shared her 10-step bedtime routine that she follows every evening for the perfect night’s sleep. 

She said she always practises deep belly breathing and meditation and takes a magnesium supplement every night, which is also known to promote sleepiness and relaxation.

Olivia likes to drink a cup of chamomile tea and banish any blue light before she settles down in bed. 

‘Know that blue light, the spectrum of light suppressing melatonin and contributing to sleep difficulties, is emitted from your bathroom’s ceiling lights as well as the bedroom and your phone,’ Olivia told FEMAIL.

For this reason, even if you work hard to avoid devices and reduce blue light exposure, this will still be undone the minute you go into your bathroom to go to the toilet or take an evening shower. 

Olivia’s 10-step bedtime routine 

1. Create a sleep sanctuary: Remove any blue light from iPhones and devices and keep your bedroom for sleep and relaxation.

2. Block blue light: Do not allow blue light into the bedroom and restrict this two hours from bedtime.

3. Set a goodnight alarm for your phone: At this point switch it off so you wake fully refreshed.

4. Diffuse lavender: Diffuse lavender either onto your pillows or throughout the room to promote relaxation.

5. Have an evening shower or bath: This helps to promote relaxation 45-60 minutes before bed.

6. Drink chamomile tea: Do this an hour before bed to make you calm.

7. Take a magnesium supplement: This helps the muscles to relax.

8. Practise gratitude: Think about what you are grateful for.

9. Try meditation: This can be useful to help you sleep.

10. Practise deep breathing: This makes it easier to sleep.

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